Ruth Curry

Ruth Curry is an observational oceanographer investigating large scale Atlantic Ocean circulation, and the physical and biogeochemical processes that control nutrient delivery, biological production and carbon exports in the Sargasso Sea. She presently runs the Mid Atlantic Glider Initiative and Collaboration (MAGIC) Lab at BIOS which provides opportunities for students to participate in autonomous underwater glider missions – deploying, tracking, piloting and receiving data back on a daily basis – and conducts research projects aligned with the current mission’s scientific objectives.  These include:

  • Quantifying the turbulent dissipation of energy that supports nutrient upwelling and its variability over the annual cycle from glider-based microstructure measurements
  • Assessing how the physical ocean environment (mixing, stratification, fronts and eddies) shapes net community productivity and the strength of the biological carbon pump
  • Measuring upper ocean heat content for applications to tropical cyclone forecasting and quantifying pre- and post-hurricane ocean structural changes

Accepting applications for: CABIOS, U.K. Associates of BIOSLehigh University Iacocca International Internship Program at BIOSREU

Dr. Samantha de Putron

Dr. Samantha de Putron is a marine biologist and ecologist with a focus on coral ecophysiology and resilience. Current research includes: documenting the physiological differences of corals inhabiting various reef zones in Bermuda to determine the effects of the environment on coral performance; understanding the role of thermal stress in driving acclimatization in corals; identifying the primary processes involved in coral growth; and long term monitoring of a disturbed coral reef to provide insight into the ecological processes of reef recovery and resilience. Potential projects include:

  • Acclimation dynamics of a tropical coral to a temperature-induced disturbance event 

Accepting applications for: CABIOS, U.K. Associates of BIOS, REU

Dr. Gretchen Goodbody-Gringley

Dr. Gretchen Goodbody-Gringley is a reef ecologist whose research is focused on understanding how coral reef ecosystems function in order to maintain biodiversity. Her research program combines large-scale in situ ecological surveys, laboratory based manipulative experiments, and molecular ecology to address questions related to the health, evolution, and resilience of coral reefs, ranging from shallow inshore reefs to the mesophotic zone. Potential projects include:

  • Assessing biodiversity and ecosystem function on mesophotic reefs
  • Ecological impacts of the invasive lionfish
  • Reproductive ecology of scleractinian corals across a depth gradient

Accepting applications for: CABIOS, Galbraith/Wardman Fellowship, Lehigh University Iacocca International Internship Program at BIOSU.K. Associates of BIOS, REU

Dr. Damian Grundle

Dr. Damian Grundle is a biogeochemical oceanographer whose research focuses on nitrogen cycling in the ocean and air/sea gas exchange. Much of his research uses stable isotope techniques (both natural abundance and tracer) to investigate the factors that regulate a range of nitrogen cycling pathways and the rates of microbially mediated nitrogen transformations. Most recently, his research has focused on how decreasing oxygen concentrations in the ocean impact the production pathways and rates of production of the greenhouse gas nitrous oxide, as well how environmental conditions in the overlying surface waters regulate nitrous oxide fluxes to the atmosphere. Potential projects include:

  • Investigating the oxygen thresholds that ‘turn on’ and ‘turn off’ the different nitrous oxide cycling pathways
  • Quantifying the impact of increased nitrite concentrations for the process of nitrifier-denitrification across a range of dissolved oxygen concentrations
  • The development of cavity ring-down spectroscopy to measure nitrous oxide stable isotopes

Accepting applications for: CABIOS, Galbraith/Wardman FellowshipLehigh University Iacocca International Internship Program at BIOSU.K. Associates of BIOS, REU

Dr. Eric Hochberg

Dr. Eric Hochberg is a biological oceanographer with main interests in the benthic ecology, oceanography, and biogeochemistry of coral reefs. His research centers on the use of optics to study reefs: bio-optics of reef organisms and communities; water column optical properties, including radiative transfer modeling; and remote sensing of reefs. Most recently he has been leading the NASA-funded COral Reef Airborne Laboratory (CORAL) mission to find the relationship between reef condition and biogeophysical forcings. Potential projects include:

  • Phenology of coral and algae pigments and optics in relation to environmental conditions
  • Characterizing water optical properties for ecology and remote sensing
  • Determining reef community light-use efficiency for photosynthesis and calcification using laboratory mesocosms and on natural reefs
  • Geospatial modeling of coral reef condition in the Great Barrier Reef, Hawaii, the Mariana Islands, Palau, and Florida through remote sensing (CORAL)
  • Developing the machine learning basis for coral reef mapping using high-resolution satellite imagery

Accepting applications for: CABIOS, Cawthorn Cambridge Internship at BIOS, Galbraith/Wardman Fellowship, Lehigh University Iacocca International Internship Program at BIOS, U.K. Associates of BIOS, REU

Dr. Amy Maas

Amy Maas is a biological oceanographer. She currently is working on multiple projects to understand how zooplankton physiology influences carbon flux and the ecology of midwater ecosystems. Currently available intern projects are associated with BIOS-SCOPE, EXPORTS and an NSF project investigating the circadian rhythms of copepods.
Potential projects include:

  • Characterizing the vertical distribution of specific zooplankton groups from MOCNESS tows
  • Determining circadian cycles in ammonium excretion of copepods
  • Determining the effect of feeding on the respiration and ammonium excretion of copepods 
  • Exploring the environmental factors that influence zooplankton size class distribution in the water column from MOCNESS datasets

Accepting applications for: CABIOS, Galbraith/Wardman Fellowship, Lehigh University Iacocca International Internship Program at BIOS, U.K. Associates of BIOS, REU

Tim Noyes

Tim Noyes is a marine ecologist and fisheries biologist focusing on reef fish habitat utilization patterns, benthic ecology, resource availability for invasive species and the deep reef refugia hypothesis. Current research includes quantifying mesophotic coral ecosystem (MCE) ichthyofauna community structure and determining connectivity between shallow reef systems. Greater knowledge on these topics is required for more effective marine spatial management. Potential projects include:

  • Employing environmental DNA (eDNA) to monitor biodiversity responses to natural and anthropogenic change
  • The refugia hypothesis, determining vertical connectivity between shallow reef and mesophotic fish assemblages and revisiting recorded depth ranges for Western Atlantic reef fish species
  • Establishing resource availability for the invasive lionfish Pterois sp.
  • The automation of fish stock assessments - a deep learning approach

Accepting applications for: CABIOS, Galbraith/Wardman FellowshipLehigh University Iacocca International Internship Program at BIOSPrinceton-BIOS InternshipU.K. Associates of BIOS, REU

Rachel Parsons

Rachel Parsons is a microbial oceanographer and research specialist at BIOS. She currently investigates the microbial communities in the Sargasso Sea using a variety of molecular techniques. She is a BIOS-SCOPE investigator; a project that uses cross-disciplinary collaborative science focusing on genomic, ecological, oceanographic and biogeochemical approaches to evaluate microbial process, structure and function in the open ocean. As a Bermudian, she is also interested in the local environment and has investigated the microbial communities and biogeochemistry around sewage outfalls, within a seasonally oxygen minimum zone and within coral reefs. Potential projects include:

  • Marine bacterioplankton succession and subsequent overturn within seasonally hypoxic waters of a subtropical sound; Devil’s Hole, Bermuda
  • The spatiotemporal distributions of SAR202 clades in the Sargasso Sea
  • The microbial community associated with aggregate formation in the Sargasso Sea
  • The microbiome of the floating brown algae, Sargassum natans and Sargassum fluitans
  • Developing microscopy protocols for the new Olympus IX83 inverted microscope

Accepting applications for: CABIOS, Galbraith/Wardman FellowshipLehigh University Iacocca International Internship Program at BIOSPrinceton-BIOS InternshipU.K. Associates of BIOS, REU

Dr. Yvonne Sawall

Dr. Yvonne Sawall is a marine biologist and coral reef ecologist with a special interest in coral ecophysiology and adaptation, as well as coral reef metabolism and carbon budgets. Currently, her research focuses on coral and algae photosynthesis and calcification using of a suite of different technologies to investigate these processes from organism to ecosystem scale. Furthermore, her work includes investigations of underlying mechanisms of coral thermal tolerance (Red Sea) and ecophysiology of seagrass. Potential projects include:

  • Assessing light use efficiencies of different coral and algal species
  • Assessing energy and carbon budgets of corals or seagrass using advanced in situ incubation chambers
  • Measuring coral community metabolism and carbon budgets using a new instrumental approach (gradient flux approach)
  • The efficiency of artificial upwelling in preventing coral bleaching during times of thermal stress
  • Using optical tools to measure productivity of corals and algae (co-mentored with Dr. Eric Hochberg)

Accepting applications for: CABIOS, Galbraith/Wardman FellowshipLehigh University Iacocca International Internship Program at BIOSU.K. Associates of BIOS, REU